greenLRExecutive Summary
Chapter 2 PrerequisitesgreenR

CHAPTER 1

2009 Marshall County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan


Chapter 1 — Introduction

1.1 Background
1.2 Authority
1.3 Funding
1.4 Eligibility for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants
1.5 Marshall County, Alabama, Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan (2004)
1.6 The 2009 Marshall County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan Update

1.1 Background

The 2009 Marshall County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan is a multi-jurisdictional guide for all communities that have participated in the preparation of this plan through the Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee (HMPC). The jurisdictions that participated in the development of this plan include the cities of Albertville, Arab, Boaz, and Guntersville, and the towns of Grant, Douglas, and Union Grove. It fulfills the requirements of the Federal Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000) as administered by the Alabama Emergency Management Agency (AEMA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IV.

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1.2 Authority

Section 322 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), 42 U. S.C. 5165 as amended by the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA) (P.L. 106-390), provides for States, Tribes, and local governments to undertake a risk-based approach to reducing risks to natural hazards through mitigation planning. The National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as amended, 42 U. S. C. 4001 et seq. reinforced the need and requirement for mitigation plans, linking flood mitigation assistance to State, Tribal and local mitigation plans.

FEMA has implemented the various hazard mitigation planning provisions through regulations in 44 CFR Part 201, which also permit man-made hazards to be addressed in a local mitigation plan. These Federal regulations describe the requirement for a State mitigation plan as a condition of pre- and post-disaster assistance as well as the mitigation plan requirement for local and Tribal governments as a condition of receiving hazard mitigation assistance. 44 CFR 201.6(d)(3) requires that a local jurisdiction must review and revise its local plan to reflect any changes and resubmit it for approval within five years of FEMA approval in order to remain eligible for mitigation grant funding.

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1.3 Funding

The Marshall County EMA applied to the Alabama EMA for planning grant funds in 2007 to complete the 2009 update of this plan. In late 2008, the Alabama EMA awarded a $65,925.00 planning grant funded through the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) to the Marshall County Commission to fund 75% of the total cost of the five year plan update for all incorporated and unincorporated areas within Marshall County

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1.4 Eligibility for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

Adoption of this plan is the initial step towards continuing eligibility for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant assistance to participating localities. These FEMA grants include the following programs:

  1. The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). The HMGP provides grants to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration. The purpose of the HMGP is to reduce the loss of life and property due to natural disasters and to enable mitigation measures to be implemented during the immediate recovery from a disaster. The HMGP is authorized under Section 404 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.

  2. The Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program (PDM). The PDM program provides funds to states, territories, Indian tribal governments, communities, and universities for hazard mitigation planning and the implementation of mitigation projects prior to a disaster event. Funding these plans and projects reduces overall risks to the population and structures, while also reducing reliance on funding from actual disaster declarations. PDM grants are to be awarded on a competitive basis and without reference to state allocations, quotas, or other formula-based allocation of funds.

  3. The Flood Mitigation Assistance Program (FMA). The FMA program was created as part of the National Flood Insurance Reform Act (NFIRA) of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 4101) with the goal of reducing or eliminating claims under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FEMA provides FMA funds to assist states and communities implement measures that reduce or eliminate the long-term risk of flood damage to buildings, manufactured homes, and other structures insurable under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

  4. The Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) Program. The Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) grant program was authorized by the Bunning-Bereuter-Blumenauer Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2004 (P.L. 108?264), which amended the National Flood Insurance Act (NFIA) of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 4001, et al). Up to $10 million is available annually for FEMA to provide RFC funds to assist states and communities reduce flood damages to insured properties that have had one or more claims to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

  5. The Severe Repetitive Loss (SRL) Program. The Severe Repetitive Loss (SRL) grant program was authorized by the Bunning-Bereuter-Blumenauer Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2004, which amended the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 to provide funding to reduce or eliminate the long-term risk of flood damage to severe repetitive loss (SRL) structures insured under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

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1.5 Marshall County, Alabama, Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan (2004)

The planning process began in January 2004 with the appointment of the Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee (HMPC) by the Local Emergency Planning Committee of the Marshall County Emergency Management Agency (EMA). The committee first convened in January 2004. In July 2004, the plan was approved and adopted by the county and all participating municipalities.

The scope of the 2004 Marshall County, Alabama, Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan is the unincorporated and incorporated areas within Marshall County. The plan addresses all natural hazards deemed to threaten property and persons within the county. Both short- and long-term hazard mitigation strategies are addressed, implementation tasks assigned, and funding alternatives identified.

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1.6 The 2009 Marshall County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan Update

The Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee (HMPC) re-convened in January 2009 to update the 2004 plan as the 2009 Marshall County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, which addresses man-made hazards in addition to natural hazards. The Marshall County Commission retained the firm of Lehe Planning, LLC, to prepare the plan under the direction of the HMPC and the Marshall County EMA Director, Anita McBurnett. The firm?s manager, James E. Lehe, AICP, a professional urban planner, served as the Planning Coordinator for the update. The 2009 HMPC represents unincorporated Marshall County, the cities of Albertville, Arab, Boaz, and Guntersville, and the towns of Grant, Douglas, and Union Grove, as well as other stakeholders and interested agencies The HMPC convened on a regular basis during the update process to oversee the drafting of the plan. Through a comprehensive planning process and risk assessment, the plan creates a unified approach among all Marshall County communities for dealing with identified hazards and associated risk issues. It serves as a guide for local governments in their ongoing efforts to reduce community vulnerabilities.

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greenLRExecutive Summary
Chapter 2 PrerequisitesgreenR